10 Toxic-Free Home-Made Easter Egg Ideas

Home-spun toxic free Easter dyes are beautiful. Photo © Liesl Clark

1) Toxic-Free Magic Marker Dye: I’ll start with my favorite because it’s so easy and does 2 things in 1. It dyes your eggs but also revives your tired out Crayola or other toxic-free magic markers. Do visit our article about it to read the full instructions, but all you need is some warm water in a glass with a splash of distilled white vinegar. Put your markers head down into the glasses, grouping them by color (we have tons of magic markers because we collect those that our school throws out and simply revive them.) That’s it! Let the eggs soak in there for as long as you wish. The longer the darker the color. If you start by making polka dots or designs on the eggs with white crayons, you’ll get a lovely design on your eggs where the wax won’t allow the dye to do it’s magic. When you’re done, pull the markers out, cap ’em and they’ll work again for you for quite some time!

2) Natural Dye: The above dyes aren’t all that natural and you wouldn’t want your child eating the ink from a magic marker, but since they’re labeled non-toxic we figure using them to dye our eggs is probably still better than using chemical food coloring. But, by far, the best option is to make your own natural dyes. There are lots of articles available on the subject. We tried it one year and liked some of the colors, but not all.

3) Kombucha Natural Dye: This recipe is similar to that above except you’re using kombucha vinegar.

4) The Ultra-Natural Easter Egg: These colorful eggs are laid as Easter eggs directly from the hens! Find yourself a dozen eggs from heritage breed hens and you’ll see that Easter egg colors can come naturally. And, Rebecca is right, brown eggs can be colored for Easter, too.

5) Sienna Easter Eggs: This beautiful technique requires onion skins and some natural items from outdoors like ferns and grasses. It leaves a beautiful sienna or sepia color on your eggs with the imprint of your fern, flower or grasses. Gorgeous.

6) Silk Tie Tie Dyed Eggs: Reuse a silk tie and tie dye your eggs.

7) No-Dye Decorating: Creative egg decorating is another great non-toxic alternative. Non toxic glue and some cute art supplies are all you need.

8) Use an Egg-Bot! This totally frivolous machine (a robot actually), if you use it with a non-toxic pen, might just wow your neighbors when you hide those eggs on the fenceline.

9) Put a ribbon on it: Wrap a ribbon around your egg and glue it down with non-toxic glue or wrap your egg in yarn with glue. These eggs look beautiful.

10) Modpodge: I’ve modpodged eggs in the past with pretty tissue paper and a light solution of sugar water that dries overnight.

Do you have any ideas to add?

10 thoughts on “10 Toxic-Free Home-Made Easter Egg Ideas

    • It’s so funny, because where I grew up, in Massachusetts, all we had were brown eggs from our chickens. White eggs were from “New York” chickens so they were thought of as less healthy, which is a hoot! But we always bought white eggs for Easter egg coloring. Now that I have my own flock of hens, we love the brown eggs, pink eggs, blue eggs, and speckled brown eggs especially for coloring. They all look great. One of our hens, an American Leghorn, lays one white egg a day. So, our egg basket looks like Easter year-round.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. We all seem to like onion skins! But I have the impression that you use yours to dye the cooking water, and use ferns etc. for your design, but I’m probably wrong. We bind the skins on with cotton to get a marbled effect on the eggs. Using ferns and flowers as well seems a lovely idea. Sadly, I haven’t bothered this year. No resident children.

    Liked by 1 person

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